Post-operative Surgical Site Infection Rates in a Public Hospital in Al-Kharj

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Nehad J. Ahmed

Abstract

Introduction: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most prevalent healthcare-associated infections that increase
mortality and morbidity rates. Aim: The present study was a retrospective study that aimed to determine the
post-operative SSI rate in a public hospital in Al-Kharj. Materials and Methods: The data were collected by
the microbiology laboratory in the hospital and included the number of infections caused by Gram-positive and
Gram-negative bacteria and the number of SSIs in the hospital. Results: Most of the infections in the present
study were caused by Gram-negative organisms (83.00%). The most common bacteria were Pseudomonas
aeruginosa (19.87%) followed by Escherichia coli (16.34%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.13%). The SSI rate
in the hospital was 2.32% (=21/906*100%). Most of the SSIs were caused by Gram-negative bacteria (80.95%).
Most of the SSIs were caused by Staphylococcus aureus (19.04%), P. aeruginosa (14.29%), Proteus mirabilis
(14.29%), Acinetobacter (14.29%), and Citrobacter (14.29%). Conclusion: The SSIs rate in Al-Kharj city is low
but adopting protocols for surveillance and implementing guidelines are still needed to minimize the SSIs rate.

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How to Cite
Ahmed, N. J. (2021). Post-operative Surgical Site Infection Rates in a Public Hospital in Al-Kharj. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutics (AJP), 15(3). https://doi.org/10.22377/ajp.v15i3.4150
Section
ORIGINAL ARTICLES